The Other News From England.

25th September 2000.

The lateness and sparcity of this edition are due to excessive pressure of need to earn a living. It is a damned nuisance the way fantasy gets in the way of real life.

Index of earlier issues - click here.

(Those who like digging about will find that there are hundreds of articles on many subjects to be found on this site.)

Old issues.

There are some much earlier Other News on this site. Click below.

early Othernews - 1992, 93, 94.

Bonnington Cafe and Bonnington Square.

This Saturday, Gabriele Gad and Hugh Harris - quiet old-fashioned jazz. From 8 onwards. No charge for the entertainment, but the hat goes round, and as seating is limited it is only fair that you should order something to eat.

Bonnington cafe is a communally owned cafe in Vauxhall, Central London. The atmosphere is somewhat Bohemian, friendly, educated, and much wine (bought from the corner shop across the road) seems to get drunk. Good quality vegetarian. Cheap. The only lighting is usually candles stuck in wine bottles, and the furniture is a collection of odds and sods that people have thrown out. The overall result is relaxed and pleasing. People tend to spend the whole evening over their meal.

The cafe gets very full, but sometimes there is a list of telephone numbers of the people who cater there in case you should wish to try to make a booking. Most Saturdays are catered by Marguerite - but not all.

Bonnington Cafe, Vauxhall Grove, London SW8 UK. Near Vauxhall underground and mainline station, and many buses. Booking is difficult.

Gabriele Gad's workshop to help you cope with computer stress.

Gabriele's computer stress course may help. I have never tried it, but doing things with Gabriele can be fun. Details of this course may be found by clicking below:

Gabriele Gad's computer stress course this October.

Joe Punter's Shakespeare.

King Henry the 6th. part 2.

ACT 2.

SCENE 4.

A street.

Enter Gloster and his men, in mourning cloaks.

GLOS.:

And thus even the brightest day may have a cloud, and winter will follow summer. What's the time sir?

SERVANT:

Almost ten.

GLOS.:

I was told I could be here at ten to see my punished duchess. How these cobbled streets will hurt her bare feet. She won't enjoy this much, poor thing. Certainly won't like the way that those who used to follow her will laugh at her shame. But soft! I think she's coming, and I must try to show my grief at her miseries.

(Enter duchess Glos barefoot, in a white sheet, with verses pinned on her back and a taper burning in her hand. She is accompanied by Sir John Stanley, the sheriff and some officers.)

SERVANT:

We'll take her from the sheriff if you like.

GLOS.:

Don't. You'll be risking your lives if you do that. Let her go on.

DUCHESS:

Have you come to see my shame? You bring shame upon yourself too by so doing. Look at 'em! See how they're pointing at you? Hide away and rue my shame in secret. Ban your and my enemies from your life.

GLOS.:

Be patient my love. Forget this grief.

DUCHESS:

Forget myself, you mean. As long as I am your wife and you are a prince and protector of this land I don't think this should be happening - all this humiliation, papers pinned on my back, a rabble following me, walking barefoot on flints, and when I wince the people laugh and tell me to tread carefully. How can I bear this shame? Will you not do something about it? That bent freemasonry of York, Suffolk, (Margaret too - ed), Beaufort and all will eventually ensnare you too, but until then keep your head up and face all foes head on.

GLOS:

Dear Nell, you've got the wrong end of the stick. No matter how many enemies, there will be no reproach as long as I remain loyal and true. If I tried to rescue you I would put myself as well as you in grave danger. No. Your greatest chance lies in staying quiet. This ten-day wonder will soon be over.

(enter a herald.)

HERALD:

I summon your grace to his majesty's parliament to be held at Bury the first of next month.

GLOS:

With not so much as a by-your-leave! Bloody cheek! Still, I'll be there.

(exit herald.)

My Nell, I must go - and you, sheriff, please do not exceed the prescribed punishment.

SHERIFF:

If you please, sir, I stop here and Sir John Stanley takes over. He will take her to the Isle of Man.

GLOS:

Must you protect her there, Sir John?

SIR JOHN STANLEY:

That is my brief sir.

GLOS:

Please look after her well. I may yet live to return the favour. And so Sir John, farewell.

DUCHESS:

What? You're not even going to say farewell to me?

GLOS:

I can't speak for tears.

DUCHESS:

May what comfort you can get go with you, for I have none mysaelf, and neither do I now want any. I would be pleased to be dead. Come on Stanley, get on with it. I don't give a stuff what you do with me. Just take me wherever it is that you have been commanded to.

SIR JOHN STANLEY:

Why, madam, to the Isle of Man, to be treated there in a manner appropriate to your state.

DUCHESS:

I am reproached. Does this mean that I shall be treated reproachfully?

SIR JOHN STANLEY:

Like a duchess, and the wife of Duke Humphrey. That is how you shall be used.

DUCHESS:

Farewell sheriff, even though you have been commissioned to see to my shame.

SHERIFF:

Please pardon me, Madam. I am only doing my job.

DUCHESS:

Yes, yes. Farewell. Your job is now done. Come, Stanley, shall we go?

SIR JOHN STANLEY:

Come madam, your penance is now complete. Throw off this sheet, and we will go to dress you for the journey.

DUCHESS:

It's no good. No matter how fine my robes I will still have my shame. Lead the way. I long to see my prison.

(All exit.)

More next week.

Vanunu.

I can tell you more about Mordechai Vanunu this week - not just his first name, but that he will shortly have been in solitary confinement for 14 years (but there was said to have been a short period when he was not in solitary, and so this might account for the ten years I was originally told of).

the vigil is outside the Israeli Embassy in London (phome book gives the address 2 Palace Gn, London W8, nearest Underground Kensington), and goes on from 10 am to 4 in the afternoon.

.......................................................................................................

The stuff that doesn`t often get changed now follows:

Biotechnology

Click here for an email that arrived in January 2000 concerning a proposed reasoned approach to this tricky subject

This website is about accounting investigations and fiddles. If you like to look at financial scandals (both hidden and public) this might be worth a look. I have not been there myself, but the books produced by these people, although difficult to follow, cover a lot of mysterious ground.

This website is about the destruction of countryside and agriculture. Worth a visit if you want to find out about how it is thought the British countryside will fair under the ongoing creep of the multinationals.

This website is one to do with monetary reform.The British Association for Monetary Reform. If you are interested in economics it is worth a look. http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~bamr1

This is a website about alternative currencies.Might be worth a look to those who have realised that you don't necessarily have to have money as such to be prosperous.

This is a website for something called The Green Guide. I know nothing about it, but am hoping it is something worthy. Please let me know if it is questionable.

This is a site concerned with one of the most unpopular planning decisions ever made in Greater London, the Crystal Palace Complex. It is so stunningly awful that only a handful of people who do not live near it appear to approve, whilst the rest are not entirely uninclined to mention such things as payola, freemasons....you name it! The site belongs to the London Borough of Bromley, but the aggro generated by it and the destruction of amenity caused by it will be almost entirely suffered by residents of adjoining boroughs and not the people of Bromley themselves.

This is a recycling site based in London, and offering materials to anybody. The organisation is a charity seeking to link suppliers of surplus materials with users. Especially good for the more ingenious designers amongst us.

The email of the people who run the above site is cs@london-recycling.demon.co.uk. They are called Creative Supplies. Look them up for more info.

Here's an interesting education site - particularly for those who have young children and are not quite sure what to do to avoid the worst of what`s on offer in the mainstream of education.They are called www.edrev.org.

early Othernews - 1992, 93, 94.

Early Other News essays.

There were a few essays that went out with the early Other News as a freestanding item. You can read these by clicking below.

Essays.

The Soup Designer`s Handbook.

The Soup Designer`s Handbook.

London Journey - a trip from Docklands through Beckenham and back to Docklands.

Friday Woodworkers.

(Friday Woodworkers are suffering a temporary break due to some of the episodes not having been fully edited at the time of writing. It may take some timne to fix this problem.

Episode 17.

(These articles were written in 1988, and were my first attempt at writing. Some people when shown these fell about laughing, some smiled faintly - and some yawned. I thought I was going to write a technical book, but it soon became apparent that I was much more interested in the people than the technology - and that is the main reason there are no drawings - although it might be rather good to do a couple of caricatures sometime.)

Index of Friday Woodorker articles (and a means of access).

Index of earlier issues.

Gabriele Gad on alternative therapy.

A READER COMPLAINED that it was not possible to go back more than 6 articles in Gabriele`s area. Regrettably this is because there is no index, and I have not the time to organise one yet. However, for those determined enough to find the early ones, they should be accessible by going to an early Other News and clicking through from it. This will not be fast, but I think will do the job. They started about November 1997 I think.

editor@othernews.co.uk

Cartoons and graphics.

drawings click here.

sheet music click here.

Consumers.

LEXMARK 3200 PRINTER.

In an earlier issue I told you about my feelings regarding Tempo retailers and the Lexmark 3200 printer I bought from them.

The Lexmark 3200 printer I got from Tempo must surely be the most uneconomical printer I could possibly have bought. The black cartridge only does about 250 pages of ordinary type - for 28! That makes each sheet cost 11.2 pence plus the cost of the paper and probably another 11.2 pence more if any colour is used! - ABOUT 22.4 PENCE A SHEET! Nearly a pound for every four sheets!

I wouldn`t recommend you to buy it - but also look at my earlier article for an idea of Tempo`s service.

Wanted

A person to help make up a subject index for the growing numbers of articles on The Other News From England. Email editor@othernews.co.uk

8- or more-track tape recorder. email pcj@gn.apc.org

All material on this site is copyright. Contact me if you want to use it. I am quite flexible. Educational non-profit use is free - but ask for permission and print an acknowledgement. If you can`t think what to print, put:

From The Other News From England. http://www.othernews.co.uk

Even better if you print the date of the article.

editor@othernews.co.uk

That`s all this week folks