The Other News From England.

22 January 2001.

Sorry. This week, the Shakespeare is so enormous there has not been time to do anything else.

Index of earlier issues - click here.

(Those who like digging about will find that there are hundreds of articles on many subjects to be found on this site.)

Old issues.

There are some much earlier Other News on this site. Click below.

early Othernews - 1992, 93, 94.

Bonnington Cafe and Bonnington Square.

This Saturday, Phil on guitar/piano, singing own stuff and others. No charge, but the hat goes round.

Bonnington cafe is a communally owned cafe in Vauxhall, Central London. The atmosphere is somewhat Bohemian, international, friendly, educated, and much wine (bought from the corner shop across the road) gets drunk. Good quality vegetarian. Cheap. The only lighting is usually candles stuck in wine bottles, and the furniture is a collection of odds and sods that people have thrown out. The overall result is relaxed and pleasing. People tend to spend the whole evening over their meal, and engage in discussion with those on other tables, the caterer, the band, passers through......

Bonnington Cafe, Vauxhall Grove, London SW8 UK. Near Vauxhall underground and mainline station, buses 185, 36, 2, 88, 322 and others. Booking is difficult.

Joe Punter's Shakespeare.

King Henry the 6th. part 3.

ACT 1 .

Scene 1.

London. Parliament.

Alarm. Enter Duke of York, Edward, Richard, Norfolk, Montague, Warwick and soldiers.

WARWICK:

I wonder how the king escaped us.

YORK:

Whilst we pursued the horsemen of the north, he sneaked off and left his men, whereupon the Lord of Northumberland, who could never bear to retreat, cheered up their army and along with Clifford and Lord Stafford charged our main battle front, and were then slain by our common soldiers as they entered.

EDWARD:

Lord Stafford's father, duke of Buckingham, is either dead or dangerously wounded, for I cleft his beaver with a downright blow; here - this blood on my sword is his (showing his bloody sword).

MARQUESS OF MONTAGUE (to York, showing his):

And, brother, here's the Earl of wiltshire's blood, who I encountered as the battle commenced.

RICHARD:

Tell them what I did. (throwing down the Duke of Somerset's head).

YORK:

Richard has served me better than all my sons. But is your grace dead, my Lord of Somerset?

DK. NORFOLK:

That's the kind of luck all descendants of John of Gaunt have.

RICHARD:

I hope to shake King Henry's head like this.

WARWICK:

And so do I. Prince of York, I shall not sleep until I see you seated in that throne the usurper Henry of the house of Lancaster currently occupies. This is the palace of the fearful king. Possess it York for it is your's not Henry's.

YORK:

Assist me then, sweet Warwick, and I will. For before, we have had to force an entry.

NORFOLK:

We'll assist you. Anyone running away shall die.

YORK:

Thanks gentle Norfolk. Stay near, my lords. And soldiers, lodge near me tonight.

WARWICK:

And when the king comes, offer him no violence unless he seeks to thrust you out by force.

(they go up)

YORK:

The queen is holding her parliament today, but doesn't imagine we shall be her council. By words or blows let's win our right.

RICHARD:

Armed as we may be, let us stay within this house.

WARWICK:

This will be called the bloody parliament if Plantagenet of York does not become king and Henry be deposed.

YORK:

Then stay with me my lords, and be resolute, for I intend to take possession of my right.

WARWICK:

Neither the king nor his followers would dare stir a wing if I shake my bells. I'll plant Richard, root him up who dares. Resolve yourself, Richard, and claim the Englsih crown.

Enter king Henry, Clifford, Northumberland, Westmoreland, Exeter and the rest.

KING H.:

Mylords, look where that sturdy rebel sits! In the chair of state! I get the impression that he intends with the support of that false peer Warwick to take the crown and reign as king. Earl of Northumberlkand, he killed your father - and yours Lord clifford. You have both vowed revenge on him, his sons, friends, favourites............

NORTHUMBERLAND:

If I am not revenged, may heaven have revenge upon me!

CLIFFORD:

ditto.

WESTMORELAND:

What? Are we going to put up with this? Let's knock him off his perch. It makes me very angry. I cannot brook it.

KING H.:

Be patient, gentle Westmoreland.

CLIFFORD:

Patience is for poltroons such as he. He would not have dared sit there were your father still alive. My gracious lord, let us assail the York family here in parliament.

NORTHUMBERLAND:

Well said, cousin. Let's do it.

KING H>

Don't you know the city favours them, and they have troops of soldiers at their beck and call.

EXETER:

But once the duke is dead they'll quickly fly.

KING H.:

To make a shambles of the parliament house would be far from ideal. Cousin of Exeter, frowns,words and threats are what I intend to use. Factious Duke of York, descend my throne and kneel for grace and mercy at my feet. I am your sovereign.

YORK:

You're deceived, I think.

EXETER:

For shame, come down. He made you duke of York.

YORK:

That was my inheritance, as was the earldom.

EXETER:

Your father was a traitor to the crown.

WARWICK:

Exeter, you are a traitor to the crown when you follow this usurping Henry.

LORD CLIFFORD:

Whom should he follow if not his natural king?

WARWICK:

True, Clifford, and that's Richard duke of York.

KING H.:

And shall I stand whilst you sit in my throne?

YORK:

It must and shall be so. content yourself.

WARWICK:

Be duke of Lancaster. Let him be king.

WESTMORELAND:

He is both king and duke of Lancaster, I maintain.

WARWICK:

And I shall disprove it. You seem to forget that we have just slain your fathers, beaten you in battle and have marched through the city to the palace gates.

NORTHUMBERLAND:

No, I remember well. And you and your house shall rue it in due course.

WESTMORELAND:

Plantagenet, of you and your sons, your kinsmen and your friends I shall have more lives than there were drops of blood in my father's veins.

LORD CLIFFORD:

Be careful what you say Warwick, in case I should revenge his death before I even stir.

WARWICK:

Poor man! How I scorn such worthless threats.

YORK:

Will you show me your title to the crown? If not, we shall settle the matter in the field of battle.

KING H.:

What title do you, traitor, have to the crown? Your father was, as you are now, duke of York, your grandfather Mortimer earl of March. I am the son of Henry the fifth who forced the dauphin of France into submission and seized their towns and provinces.

WARWICK:

Don't talk about France, since you have lost it all.

KING H.:

The lord protector lost it, not I. I was only nine moths old.

RICHARD:

You are old enough now, and yet I think you lose. Father, tear the crown from the usurper's head.

MARQUESS OF MONTAGUE (to York):

good brother, as you love and honour arms let's fight it out and not stand cavilling like this.

RICHARD:

sound drums and trumpets and the king will run.

YORK:

Sons, peace!

KING H.:

Peace you! And give King Henry leave to speak.

WARWICK:

Plantagenet will speak first. Hear him lords, and be silent and attentive, for whoever interrupts shall not live.

KING H.:

Do you think I will leave my kingly throne in which my father and his father before him sat? No. Before that happens war will kill most of my people off. Yes, and their colours, often borne in France and now to our great sorrow in England, shall be my winding sheet. Why are you looking so pale Lords? My title is good, and far better than his.

WARWICK:

Prove it, Henry, and you shall be king.

KING H.:

King Henry the fourth by conquest got the crown.

YORK:

It was by rebellion against his king.

KING H. (aside):

I don't know what to say. My title is weak. - Tell me, may not a king adopt an heir?

YORK:

What then?

KING H.

If he may, then I am lawful king. For Richard, in the view of many lords, resigned the cronw to Henry the fourth, my grandfather, whose heir was my father, and I am my father's heir.

YORK:

He rose against him, being his sovereign, and made him resign his crown by force.

WARWICK:

Suppose, my lords, that he did it unconstrained, would you think it were prejudicial to his crown?

EXETER:

No. For he could not resign his crown, but that the next heir should succeed and reign.

KING H.:

Are you against me, Exeter?

EXETER.:

His is the right, and therefore pardon me.

YORK:

Why do you whisper, my lords, and not answer?

EXETER:

My conscience tells me he is lawful king.

KING H.:

All will revolt against me and turn to him.

NORTHUMBERLAND:

Plantagenet, for all the proof you claim, do not think that Henry shall be deposed.

WARWICK:

He shall be deposed, despite all.

NORTHUMBERLAND:

You're deceived. It's not your southern power - Essex, Norfolk, Suffolk nor Kent which makes you so presumptuous and proud - can set the duke up in spite of me.

CLIFFORD:

King Henry, be your title right or wrong I vow to stand in your defence. May the ground gape and swallow me up before I shall kneel to he who killed my father!

KING H.:

Oh Clifford! How your words revive my spirit!

YORK:

Henry of Lancaster, resing your crown - What are you lords muttering or conspiring about?

WARWICK:

Do right unto this princley duke of York or I will fill this house with armed men and over the chair of state where he now sits write up his title with usurping blood.

(he stamps his foot, and soldiers show themselves)

KING H.:

My lord of Warwick, just hear one word:- let me for my lifetime reign as king.

YORK:

Confirm the crown to me and my heirs and you shall reign in quiet whilst you live.

KING H.:

I am content. Richard Plantagenet, enjoy the kingdom after my decease.

CLIFFORD:

What a wrong this is to the prince your son!

WARWICK:

What good this is to england and to himself!

WESTMORELAND:

Base, fearful and despairing Henry!

CLIFFORD:

How you have injured both yourself and us!

WESTMORELAND:

I cannot stay to hear this.

NORTHUMBERLAND:

Nor I.

CLIFFORD.:

come, cousin, let us tell the queen this news.

EWSTMORELAND:

Farewell, faint-hearted and degenerate king, in whose blood no spark of honour abodes!

NORTHUMBERLAND:

Be you a prey to the house of York and die in shackles for this unmanly deed!

CLIFFORD:

in dreadful war may you be overcome, or live in peace abandoned and despised!

(exit Northumberland, Clifford and Westmoreland).

WARWICK:

Turn this way, Henry, and ignore them.

EXETER:

They want revenge, and therefore will not yield.

KING H.:

Ah, Exeter!

WARWICK:

Why should you sigh my lord?

KING H.:

Not for myself, Lord Warwick, but my son, who unnaturally I will disinherit. But be that as it may, I entail the crown to you, and to your heirs forever, on condition that you will take an oath to cease this civil war, and whilst I live to honour me as your king and sovereign, and by no means to put me down and reign yourself.

YORK:

This oath I willingly take, and will perform.

WARWICK:

Long live King Henry! Plantagenet, embrace him!

KING H.:

And long live you, and these your forward sons!

YORK:

Now York and Lancaster are reconsiled.

EXETER:

Accursed be anyone who seeks to them his foes!

(sennet. Here they come down)

YORK:

Farewell my gracious lord. I'll go to my castle.

WARWICK:

And I'll keep Lond with my soldiers.

NORFOLK:

And I to Norfolk with my followers.

MARQUESS OF MONTAGUE:

And I to the, where I came from.

(exit York and his sons, Warwick, Norfolk, Montague, Soldiers and attendants.)

KING H.:

And I, with grief and sorrow, to the court.

EXETER:

Here comes the queen, whose looks betray her anger; I think I'll just disappear....

(going)

KING H.:

Exeter, so will I.

(going)

Enter queen Margaret and the prince of Wales.

QUEEN:

No. Don't go. I will follow you.

KING H.

Be patient, gentle queen, and I will stay.

QUEEN:

Who can be patient in such circumstances? Wretched man! I wish to hell I'd died as a maid, had never seen you, had never borne you a son since you are such an unnatural father! Has he deserved to lose his birthright like this? Had you but loved him half as well as I doYou could not possibly have done that which you have just done and disinherited your own son.

PRINCE OF WALES:

Father you cannot disinherit me. If you are king, why should I not succeed?

KING H.:

Pardon me both of you. Warwick and the duke forced me.

QUEEN:

What! You're king and you are forced? I'm ashamed to hear you speak, you timorous wretch! You have undone yourself, your son, and me, and given the house of York such power that they shall only allow you to reign by their sufferance. What is it to do this but to dig your own grave and invite death long before your time? Warwick is chancellor, and Lord of Calais; Falconbridge commands the Channel; the duke is made Protector of the realm; And yet shall you be safe? Such safety finds the lamb environed with wolves. Had I been there, silly woman though I may be, thoise soldiers would have tossed me on their pikes before I would have granted that act.......but you prefer your life before your honour: And seeing that youy do, I hereby divorce myself from your table, Henry, and your bed, until that Act of Parliament be repealed whereby my son is disinherited. The northern lords who have foresworn your colours will follow mine if they once see them spread - and spread they shall be, to your very great disgrace and the utter ruin of the House of York. Come, son, let's go. the army is ready. Come, we'll go after them.

KING H.:

Stay, gentle Margaret, and hear me speak.

QUEEN:

You've said too much already. Go.

KING H.:

Gentle son Edward, will you stay with me?

QUEEN:

Aye, to murdered by his enemies.

EDWARD:

When I return with victory from the field, I'll see your grace. Till then I'll follow her.

QUEEN:

Come, son, away. We may not linger thus.

(exit queen and prince)

KING H.

Poor queen! How love for me and her son has made her rage! May she be revenged on that hateful duke., whose haughty spirit winged with desire will cost my crown and and tire on the flesh of me and my son! The loss of those three lords torments my heart. I'll write to them and entreat them fair: - Come, cousin, you shall be the messenger.

EXETER:

And I, I hope, shall reconcile them all.

(All exit)

More next week.

Southwark Social Investment Forum.

Southwark Social Investment Forum (NOT a 'council initiative') have released the news that they are holding a large function for all manner of community groups, LETS, hourbanks, self-help groups, green, etc on the 7th. April 2001 at Clubland, Walworth Rd. SE17 (almost where it changes to Camberwell Rd).

Peter Challen, who seems to be the person trying hardest at the moment to drive this idea forward, said that it was trying desperately hard not to be a 'top-down' operation where the organisers tell everybody what to do, so much as a 'bottom up' one where most of the actions are decided by the participants. In other words, it is hope that there will be very little 'official interference'.

A free stall is available to suitable participants. The idea is to get as large a variety of non-commercial, non-political, non-council groups as possible attending to show other participants (which means not just the groups but as many members of the public as possible) what they do. Current participant list includes LETSLink London, Southwark LETS, CFIM (some of these I don't know what the initials are for), New Economics Foundation, SAVO, Marsh Farm New Deal Community (from Luton), Sustainable Southwark (ABS Consulting), South Bank University. Many other community groups have been invited, but have not yet stated if they will participate.

It is hoped there will be various entertainments in and around the show.

Many more groups are being approached, and not all of them are from Southwark. Would yours be interested? There may be a limit on the amount and size of stall spaces.

Email Peter Challen (101665.1247@compuserve.com) if you would like to participate.

...........................................................................................................................

The stuff that doesn`t often get changed now follows:

Alternet News.

Alternet News might appeal to some readers as a regular list of goings-on in the human rights/green areas of life. You can receive it by email. I have put one copy on this site so that you get an idea of what it is about and how to subscribe.

For sample Alternet email click here.

Biotechnology

Click here for an email that arrived in January 2000 concerning a proposed reasoned approach to this tricky subject

Goforth's social justice e-zine.

This interesting email magazine comes at fairly regular intervals and is of interest to almost anybody who is interested in human rights and green issues. In November 2000 it was going out to about 10,000 addresses. Try it. It won't cost you anything, and you can reproduce the contents without paying. You can subscribe by writing to them at: sjzine@netscape.net, or visit http://members.tripod.com/~goforth/socialjustice.html . Unsubscribe the same way.

This website is about accounting investigations and fiddles. If you like to look at financial scandals (both hidden and public) this might be worth a look. I have not been there myself, but the books produced by these people, although difficult to follow, cover a lot of mysterious ground.

This website is about the destruction of countryside and agriculture. Worth a visit if you want to find out about how it is thought the British countryside will fair under the ongoing creep of the multinationals.

This website is one to do with monetary reform.The British Association for Monetary Reform. If you are interested in economics it is worth a look. http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~bamr1

This is a website about alternative currencies.Might be worth a look to those who have realised that you don't necessarily have to have money as such to be prosperous.

This is a website for something called The Green Guide. I know nothing about it, but am hoping it is something worthy. Please let me know if it is questionable.

This is a site concerned with one of the most unpopular planning decisions ever made in Greater London, the Crystal Palace Complex. It is so stunningly awful that only a handful of people who do not live near it appear to approve, whilst the rest are not entirely uninclined to mention such things as payola, freemasons....you name it! The site belongs to the London Borough of Bromley, but the aggro generated by it and the destruction of amenity caused by it will be almost entirely suffered by residents of adjoining boroughs and not the people of Bromley themselves.

This is a recycling site based in London, and offering materials to anybody. The organisation is a charity seeking to link suppliers of surplus materials with users. Especially good for the more ingenious designers amongst us.

The email of the people who run the above site is cs@london-recycling.demon.co.uk. They are called Creative Supplies. Look them up for more info.

Here's an interesting education site - particularly for those who have young children and are not quite sure what to do to avoid the worst of what`s on offer in the mainstream of education.They are called www.edrev.org.

early Othernews - 1992, 93, 94.

Early Other News essays.

There were a few essays that went out with the early Other News as a freestanding item. You can read these by clicking below.

Essays.

The Soup Designer`s Handbook.

The Soup Designer`s Handbook.

London Journey - a trip from Docklands through Beckenham and back to Docklands.

Friday Woodworkers.

(Friday Woodworkers are suffering a temporary break due to some of the episodes not having been fully edited at the time of writing. It may take some timne to fix this problem.

Episode 17.

(These articles were written in 1988, and were my first attempt at writing. Some people when shown these fell about laughing, some smiled faintly - and some yawned. I thought I was going to write a technical book, but it soon became apparent that I was much more interested in the people than the technology - and that is the main reason there are no drawings - although it might be rather good to do a couple of caricatures sometime.)

Index of Friday Woodorker articles (and a means of access).

Index of earlier issues.

Gabriele Gad on alternative therapy.

A READER COMPLAINED that it was not possible to go back more than 6 articles in Gabriele`s area. Regrettably this is because there is no index, and I have not the time to organise one yet. However, for those determined enough to find the early ones, they should be accessible by going to an early Other News and clicking through from it. This will not be fast, but I think will do the job. They started about November 1997 I think.

editor@othernews.co.uk

Cartoons and graphics.

drawings click here.

sheet music click here.

Consumers.

LEXMARK 3200 PRINTER.

In an earlier issue I told you about my feelings regarding Tempo retailers and the Lexmark 3200 printer I bought from them.

The Lexmark 3200 printer I got from Tempo must surely be the most uneconomical printer I could possibly have bought. The black cartridge only does about 250 pages of ordinary type - for 28! That makes each sheet cost 11.2 pence plus the cost of the paper and probably another 11.2 pence more if any colour is used! - ABOUT 22.4 PENCE A SHEET! Nearly a pound for every four sheets!

I wouldn`t recommend you to buy it - but also look at my earlier article for an idea of Tempo`s service.

Wanted

A person to help make up a subject index for the growing numbers of articles on The Other News From England. Email editor@othernews.co.uk

8- or more-track tape recorder. email pcj@gn.apc.org

All material on this site is copyright. Contact me if you want to use it. I am quite flexible. Educational non-profit use is free - but ask for permission and print an acknowledgement. If you can`t think what to print, put:

From The Other News From England. http://www.othernews.co.uk

Even better if you print the date of the article.

editor@othernews.co.uk

That`s all this week folks