The Other News From England.

2 April 2001.

Index of earlier issues - click here.

(Those who like digging about will find that there are hundreds of articles on many subjects to be found on this site.)

Old issues.

There are some much earlier Other News on this site. Click below.

early Othernews - 1992, 93, 94.

Bonnington Cafe and Bonnington Square.

This Saturday, unknown act, but possibly Gabriele Gad and Hugh Harris (Piano and saxophone - old-fashioned melodic jazz to a good old-fashioned standard). No charge, but the hat goes round.

Bonnington cafe is a communally owned cafe in Vauxhall, Central London. The atmosphere is somewhat Bohemian, international, friendly, educated, and much wine (bought from the corner shop across the road) gets drunk. Good quality vegetarian. Cheap. The only lighting is usually candles stuck in wine bottles, and the furniture is a collection of odds and sods that people have thrown out. The overall result is relaxed and pleasing. People tend to spend the whole evening over their meal, and engage in discussion with those on other tables, the caterer, the band, passers through......

Bonnington Cafe, Vauxhall Grove, London SW8 UK. Near Vauxhall underground and mainline station, buses 185, 36, 2, 88, 322 and others. Booking is difficult.

Community economics.

7th April meeting of many groups.

(Held over again).

Southwark Social Investment Forum is on the 7th. April at Clubland, Walworth Rd., London SE17 - near the junction with Albany Road. Community groups of many kinds, including LETS, green, musical groups, Sinclair Music School, choirs, theatrical, and etc. A free stall is available for your organisation as long as it is some sort of a community thing.

Clubland is a huge place, so there can be an awful lot going on in there.

Not council sponsored, so it should be quite good fun.

Creator's Rights Alliance.

This is just a correction. That which was presented as the Creative Rights Alliance in the last two issues should in fact have been called ther Creator's Right Alliance.

I recommend your reading it if you do any 'creative' work to make a living. They might be who you need instead of a union.

Joe Punter's Shakespeare.

King Henry the 6th. part 3.

ACT 3 .

Scene 2.

London. A room in the palace.

Enter king Edward, Gloster, Clarence, and Lady Grey.

KING ED.:

Brother Gloster, at St. Albans this lady's husband, Sir Richard Grey, was killed and his lands seized by the conqueror. She now comes to ask for these lands to be restored to her, which we cannot reasonably deny because he lost his life fighting for the house of York.

GLOSTER:

Your highness would do well to grant her wish. It would be a dishonour to deny it to her.

KING ED.:

It would be no less, yet for a while I shall pause.

GLOSTER (aside to Clarence):

Yeah, is it so? I see the lady has to grant something before her humble request is honoured.

CLARENCE (aside to Gloster):

He knows the game! How true he keeps the wind.

GLOSTER (aside to Clarence):

Silence!

KING ED.:

Widow, I will consider your request. Please come some other time to know my decision.

LADY GREY:

My right gracious lord, I cannot brook delay. May it please your lord to resolve this now, and whatever is your pleasure shall satisfy me.

GLOSTER (aside):

Ay, widow? Then I think you'll get all your lands if what pleases him shall pleasure you. Fight closer, or by god you'll catch a blow.

CLARENCE (aside to Gloster):

I don't fear her, unless she chances to fall.

GLOSTER (aside to Clarence):

God forbid that! For he'll take advantages.

KING ED.:

How many children have you, widow, tell me?

CLARENCE (aside to Gloster):

I think he means to ask her for a child.

GLOSTER (aside to Clarence):

Nay, I think he'll rather give her two.

LADY GREY:

Three, my most gracious lord.

GLOSTER (aside):

You shall have four if you'll be ruled by him.

KING ED.:

It is a pity they should lose their father's lands.

LADY GREY:

Be pityful, then, dread lord, and grant my request.

KING ED.:

Lords, give us leave. I'll try this widow's wit.

GLOSTER (aside):

Aye, good leave you have. This you will have till youth takes leave of you and leaves you to the crutch.

(retires with Clarence)

KING ED.:

Now. tell me madam, do you love your children?

LADY GREY:

Aye, full as dearly as I love myself.

KING ED.:

And would you not do much to do them good?

LADY GREY:

To do them good, I would sustain some harm.

KING ED.:

Then get your husband's lands, to do them good.

LADY GREY:

That is why I came to your majesty.

KING ED.:

I'll tell you how these lands are to be got.

LADY GREY:

Thus you will bind me to your service.

KING ED.:

What service will you do me if I give them?

LADY GREY:

Whatever you command that I am able to do.

KING ED.:

But you will take exception to my request.

LADY GREY:

No gracious lord, unless it is something I cannot do.

KING ED.:

Aye, but yuop can that which I mean to ask.

LADY GREY:

Why, then I shall do what your grace commands.

GLOSTER (aside to Clarence):

He plies her hard, and much rain wears the marble.

CLARENCE (aside to Gloster):

As red as fire! Nay, then her wax must melt.

LADY GREY:

What stops you, my lord? Shall I not hear what my task is?

KING ED.:

An easy task. 'tis but to love a king.

LADY GREY:

That is easily performed, since I am your subject.

KING ED.:

Why, then your husband's lands I freely give you.

LADY GREY:

I take my leave with many thousand thanks.

GLOSTER (aside to Clarence):

The match is made. She seals it with a curt'sy.

KING ED.:

But stay! It is the fruits of love I mean.

LADY GREY:

The fruits of love I mean, my loving liege.

KING ED.:

Aye, but I fear you mean it in another way. What love do you think I am trying so hard to get?

LADY GREY:

My love til l death, my humble thanks, my prayers. That love which virtue begs and virtue grants.

KING ED.:

No, by my troth, I did not mean that type of love.

LADY GREY:

Then you do not mean that which I thought you did.

KING ED.:

But now you may partly understand me.

LADY GREY:

My mind will never grant what I believe your highness is asking for, if I am right.

KING ED.:

To tell you plain, I wish to sleep with you.

LADY GREY:

To tell you plainly, I would rather lie in prison.

KING ED.:

Why, then you shall not have your husband's lands.

LADY GREY:

Then my honesty is my dowry, for I will not make that loss to purchase them.

KING ED.:

Therein you wrong your children mightily.

LADY GREY:

And therein your highness wrongs both them and me. But, mighty lord, this merry inclination does not accord with the sadness of my request. Please dismiss me with either a 'yes' or a 'no'.

KING ED.:

Yes if you will say 'yes' to my request, no if you say 'no' to my demand.

LADY GREY:

Then, no my lord. My suit is at an end.

GLOSTER (aside to Clarence):

The widow does not like him. She is knitting her brows.

CLARENCE (aside to Gloster):

He is the bluntest wooer in Christendom!

KING ED. (aside):

Her looks argue that she is being modest. Her words show her wit to be incomparable. All her perfections suggest sovereignty. One way or another, she is for a king, and she shall be my love or else my queen. Say that King Edward takes thee for his queen?

LADY GREY:

'tis better said than done, my gracious lord. I may be fit to jest with, but I am far unfit to be a sovereign.

KING ED.:

Sweet widow, by my state I swear to you that I speak no more than my soul intends, and that is to enjoy thee for my love.

LADY GREY:

And that is more than I will yield to. I know I am too lowly to be your queen and yet too good to be your concubine.

KING ED.:

You mock me now.I did mean for you to be my queen.

LADY GREY:

It would grive your grace to have my sons call you father.

KING ED.:

No more than when my daughters call you mother. You are a widow, and you have some children. And, by God's mother, being a bachelor have some. 'Tis a happy thing to be a father unto many sons. Answer no more, for you shall be my queen.

GLOSTER (aside to Clarence):

The ghostly father has now done his shrift.

CLARENCE (aside to Gloster):

When he was made a shriver, 'twas for shift.

KING ED.:

Brothers, think about what a chat we two have had.

GLOSTER:

The widow does not like it, for she looks sad.

KING ED.:

You'd think it strange if I should marry her.

CLARENCE:

To whom, my lord?

KING ED.:

Why, to myself, Clarence.

GLOSTER:

'twould be a ten days' wonder at the least. CLARENCE:

That's a day longer than a wonder lasts.

GLOSTER:

By that much the wonder is in extremes.

KING ED.

Well, jest on, brothers. I can tell you both her suit is granted for her husband's lands.

Enter a nobleman.

NOBLEMAN:

My gracious lord, your foe Henry has been taken, and is brought as prisoner to your palace gate.

KING ED.:

See that he is conveyed to the tower, and we shall go, brothers, to the man who took him to find out how it happened. Widow, you go along. Lords, use her honorably.

(Exit all except Gloster.)

This act will be continued next week)

POLITICS.

WITH elections coming up, wouldn't it be nice if had a party we could find a good reason to vote for instead of two parties to vote against?

...........................................................................................................................

The stuff that doesn`t often get changed now follows:

Alternet News.

Alternet News might appeal to some readers as a regular list of goings-on in the human rights/green areas of life. You can receive it by email. I have put one copy on this site so that you get an idea of what it is about and how to subscribe.

For sample Alternet email click here.

Biotechnology

Click here for an email that arrived in January 2000 concerning a proposed reasoned approach to this tricky subject

Goforth's social justice e-zine.

This interesting email magazine comes at fairly regular intervals and is of interest to almost anybody who is interested in human rights and green issues. In November 2000 it was going out to about 10,000 addresses. Try it. It won't cost you anything, and you can reproduce the contents without paying. You can subscribe by writing to them at: sjzine@netscape.net, or visit: Goforth's site

This website is about accounting investigations and fiddles. If you like to look at financial scandals (both hidden and public) this might be worth a look. I have not been there myself, but the books produced by these people, although difficult to follow, cover a lot of mysterious ground.

This website is about the destruction of countryside and agriculture. Worth a visit if you want to find out about how it is thought the British countryside will fair under the ongoing creep of the multinationals.

This website is one to do with monetary reform.The British Association for Monetary Reform. If you are interested in economics it is worth a look. http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~bamr1

This is a website about alternative currencies.Might be worth a look to those who have realised that you don't necessarily have to have money as such to be prosperous.

This is a website for something called The Green Guide. I know nothing about it, but am hoping it is something worthy. Please let me know if it is questionable.

This is a site concerned with one of the most unpopular planning decisions ever made in Greater London, the Crystal Palace Complex. It is so stunningly awful that only a handful of people who do not live near it appear to approve, whilst the rest are not entirely uninclined to mention such things as payola, freemasons....you name it! The site belongs to the London Borough of Bromley, but the aggro generated by it and the destruction of amenity caused by it will be almost entirely suffered by residents of adjoining boroughs and not the people of Bromley themselves.

This is a recycling site based in London, and offering materials to anybody. The organisation is a charity seeking to link suppliers of surplus materials with users. Especially good for the more ingenious designers amongst us.

The email of the people who run the above site is cs@london-recycling.demon.co.uk. They are called Creative Supplies. Look them up for more info.

Here's an interesting education site - particularly for those who have young children and are not quite sure what to do to avoid the worst of what`s on offer in the mainstream of education.They are called www.edrev.org.

early Othernews - 1992, 93, 94.

Early Other News essays.

There were a few essays that went out with the early Other News as a freestanding item. You can read these by clicking below.

Essays.

The Soup Designer`s Handbook.

The Soup Designer`s Handbook.

London Journey - a trip from Docklands through Beckenham and back to Docklands.

Friday Woodworkers.

(Friday Woodworkers are suffering a temporary break due to some of the episodes not having been fully edited at the time of writing. It may take some timne to fix this problem.

Episode 17.

(These articles were written in 1988, and were my first attempt at writing. Some people when shown these fell about laughing, some smiled faintly - and some yawned. I thought I was going to write a technical book, but it soon became apparent that I was much more interested in the people than the technology - and that is the main reason there are no drawings - although it might be rather good to do a couple of caricatures sometime.)

Index of Friday Woodorker articles (and a means of access).

Index of earlier issues.

Gabriele Gad on alternative therapy.

A READER COMPLAINED that it was not possible to go back more than 6 articles in Gabriele`s area. Regrettably this is because there is no index, and I have not the time to organise one yet. However, for those determined enough to find the early ones, they should be accessible by going to an early Other News and clicking through from it. This will not be fast, but I think will do the job. They started about November 1997 I think.

editor@othernews.co.uk

Cartoons and graphics.

drawings click here.

sheet music click here.

Consumers.

LEXMARK 3200 PRINTER.

In an earlier issue I told you about my feelings regarding Tempo retailers and the Lexmark 3200 printer I bought from them.

The Lexmark 3200 printer I got from Tempo must surely be the most uneconomical printer I could possibly have bought. The black cartridge only does about 250 pages of ordinary type - for 28! That makes each sheet cost 11.2 pence plus the cost of the paper and probably another 11.2 pence more if any colour is used! - ABOUT 22.4 PENCE A SHEET! Nearly a pound for every four sheets!

I wouldn`t recommend you to buy it - but also look at my earlier article for an idea of Tempo`s service.

Wanted

A person to help make up a subject index for the growing numbers of articles on The Other News From England. Email editor@othernews.co.uk (this may now have been provided, but please email if you might like to join in in some way - ed.)

All material on this site is copyright. Contact me if you want to use it. I am quite flexible. Educational non-profit use is free - but ask for permission and print an acknowledgement. If you can`t think what to print, put:

From The Other News From England. http://www.othernews.co.uk

Even better if you print the date of the article.

editor@othernews.co.uk

That`s all this week folks