The Other News From England.

16 April 2001.

Index of earlier issues - click here.

(Those who like digging about will find that there are hundreds of articles on many subjects to be found on this site.)

Old issues.

There are some much earlier Other News on this site. Click below.

early Othernews - 1992, 93, 94.

Bonnington Cafe and Bonnington Square.

This Saturday, unknown act. No charge, but the hat goes round.

Bonnington cafe is a communally owned cafe in Vauxhall, Central London. The atmosphere is somewhat Bohemian, international, friendly, educated, and much wine (bought from the corner shop across the road) gets drunk. Good quality vegetarian. Cheap. The only lighting is usually candles stuck in wine bottles, and the furniture is a collection of odds and sods that people have thrown out. The overall result is relaxed and pleasing. People tend to spend the whole evening over their meal, and engage in discussion with those on other tables, the caterer, the band, passers through......

Bonnington Cafe, Vauxhall Grove, London SW8 UK. Near Vauxhall underground and mainline station, buses 185, 36, 2, 88, 322 and others. Booking is difficult.

Joe Punter's Shakespeare.

King Henry the 6th. part 3.

ACT 3 .

Scene 3.

France. The kings's palace.

Flourish. enter Louis the French king, his sister Bona, his admiral called Bourbon, Prince Edward, Queen Margaret, and the Earl of Oxford. Louis sits and rises up again.

LOUIS:

Fair queen of England, worthy Margaret, sit down with us. It ill befits thy state and birth for thee to stand whilst Louis does sit.

MARGARET:

No, mighty king of France. Now I must learn to serve where kings command. I was, I must confess, great Albion's queen in former days, but now mischance hath trod my title down and dishonour has laid me on the ground. I have need now to be humble.

LOUIS:

From whence does this deep despair spring, fair queen?

MARGARET:

From such a cause as fills my eyes with tears and stops my tongue, whilst my heart is drowned in cares.

LOUIS:

Whatever it is, still remain true to yourself. Sit down beside me.

(seats her beside him)

Don't be overcome by misfortunes. You can still ride in triumph over ill luck. Be plain, queen Margaret, and tell thy grief. It shall be eased if France can give relief.

MARGARET:

Your gracious words revive my drooping morale, and give my tongue permission to speak, and therefore let it be known to you that Henry, sole possessor of my love, has become not a king but a banished man, and forced to live in Scotland, whilst the proud and ambitious Edward duke of York usurps the royal title and the seat of England's true-anointed and lawful king. This is why I and my son have come to ask your just and lawful aid - and if you fail us all our hope is done. Scotland has the will to help, but not the ability, our people and peers are both misled, our soldiers put to flight, and, as you know, we are in dire plight.

LOUIS:

Renowned queen, calm the storm with patience whilst we think of a means of breaking it off.

MARGARET:

The more we stay, the stronger our foe grows.

LOUIS:

The more I stay, the more I'll help you.

MARGARET:

Oh but impatience waits on true sorrow...and see - here comes the breeder of my sorrow....

(enter Warwick, attended).

LOUIS:

Who's this that comes so boldly into our presence?

MARGARET:

Earl of Warwick, Edward's greatest friend.

LOUIS:

Welcome, brave Warwick! What brings thee to France?

MARGARET (aside):

Aye, now a second storm is brewing, for this is he who moves both wind and tide.

WARWICK:

From worthy Edward, king of Albion, my lord and sovereign, and your avowed friend, I come, in kindness and unfeigned love, first to greet thy royal person, and then to crave a friendship, and finally to crave the hand of thy virtuous sister Bona to be bride to England's king in lawful marriage.

MARGARET (aside):

If that goes forward, Henry's hope is done.

WARWICK (to Bona):

And, gracious madam, on our king's behalf I am commanded, with your permission, to kiss your hand, and with my tongue to tell you the passion of my sovereign's heart, where your fame has placed your beauty's image and your virtue.

MARGARET:

King Louis, and my lady Bona, hear me speak before you answer Warwick. His demand does not spring from Edward's heart, but from deceit bred by necessity. For how can a tyrant govern well at home without first purchasing support from abroad? To prove him to be a tyrant this reason may suffice - that Henry still lives, and even if he were dead it would be Edward his son who would be sovereign, not that Edward who currently usurps him. Think, therefore, Louis, that by this alliance going ahead you would draw to yourself danger and dishonour, for though usurpers rule for a while yet heavens are just and time punishes wrongs.

WARWICK:

Injurious Margaret!

PRINCE EDWARD:

And why not queen?

WARWICK:

Because your father did usurp, and you are no more prince than she is queen.

EARL OF OXFORD:

Then you dismiss the great John of Gaunt, who did subdue the greater part of Spain, and after he, Henry the fourth, whose wisdom was mirror to the wisest, and after that wise prince, Henry the fifth who by his prowess conquered all France, and from whom our Henry is directly descended.

WARWICK:

Oxford, how does it happen that in this smooth discourse you have forgetten to mention how Henry the sixth lost all that which Henry the fifth had gained? Methinks these peers of France will smile at that - but for the rest, you have only told of a lineage of sixty two years - a silly time to claim a kingdom's worth.

OXFORD:

Why, Warwick, can you speak so freely against your lord whom you obeyed for thirty six years and not even blush about your treason?

WARWICK:

Can Oxford not even recognise the right? Will you shield falsehood with a pedigree? For shame! leave Henry, and call Edward king.

OXFORD:

Call him king who killed my elder brother the Lord Aubrey Vere? and more so - even my father who already was old enough to be on the doors of death? No, Warwick, no. Whilst life still upholds this arm, this arm upholds the house of Lancaster.

WARWICK:

And I the house of York.

LOUIS:

Margaret, prince Edward and Oxford pray stand aside whilst I conference with Warwick.

(they stand aloof)

MARGARET:

Heaven grant that Warwick's words do not bewitch him.

LOUIS:

Now, Warwick, tell me. On your conscience, is Edward your true king? For I would be loth to link with him who is not lawfully chosen.

WARWICK:

Thereupon I pawn my credit and mine honour.

LOUIS:

But is he gracious in the eyes of the people?

WARWICK:

The more that Henry was unfortunate.

LOUIS:

Then further - all other things aside, tell me truthfully the measure of his love for our sister Bona.

WARWICK:

Such it seems as may beseem a monarch like himself. I have often heard him swear that his love was an eternal plant whose root was fixed in virtue's ground, the leaves and fruit maintained by beauty's sun, exempt from envy but not disdain, unless the lady Bona quit his pain.

LOUIS:

Now, sister, let us hear your firm resolve.

BONA:

Your grant or your denial shall be mine - yet I confess that often when I have heard your king's merits recounted I have felt inclined to desire.

LOUIS:

Then, Warwick, thus: Our sister shall be Edward's, and now forthwith shall articles be drawn touching on the terms of the contract. Draw near, queen Margaret, and be a witness that Bona shall be wife to the English king.

PRINCE EDWARD:

To Edward, but not to the English king.

MARGARET:

Deceitful Warwick! This was done just to defuse my suit. Before you came, Louis was Henry's friend.

LOUIS:

And still is friend to him and Margaret. But if your title to the crown is weak - as may appear to be the case by Edward's success - then it is reasonable that I should be released from giving the aid which I promised. Yet you shall have all kindness at my hand that your estate requires and mine can yield.

WARWICK:

Henry now lives in Scotland at his ease, where he has nothing and so can lose nothing. As to you, our once queen, you have a father able to maintain you, and it would be better that you troubled him than France troubled him.

MARGARET:

Peace, impudent and shameless Warwick! peace, proud setter-up and puller-down of kings! I will not leave until I can convince king Louis of the double-dealing and falsehood of your lord's love. For both of you are birds of the same feather.

(POST blowing a horn within.)

LOUIS:

Warwick, this is some post to me or you.

Enter the post.)

POST (to Warwick):

My lord ambassador, these letters are for you, sent from your brother marquess Montague. - (to Louis) these from our king unto your majesty - (to Margaret) and, Madam,a these are for you, from whom I know not.

(they all read their letters).

OXFORD:

I like it well that our fair queen smiles at her news, whilst Warwick frowns at his.

PRINCE EDWARD:

Nay, mark how Louis stamps, as though he were nettled. I hope all is for the best.

LOUIS:

Warwick, what are thy news? - and yours, fair queen?

MARGARET:

Mine fills my heart with unhoped-for joys.

WARWICK:

Mine full of sorrow and discontent.

LOUIS:

What! Has your king married the lady Grey? And now, to sooth your forgery and his, sends me a paper to ask me to be patient? Is this the alliance that he seeks with France? Dare he presume to scorn us in this manner?

MARGARET:

I told your majesty as much before. This proves the measure of both Edward's love and Warwick's honesty.

WARWICK:

King Louis, I protest in the eyes of heaven that I am innocent of this misdeed of Edward's, - who is no longer my king for he dishonours me, but mostly himself if he could see his shame. Did I forget that by the house of York my father came to an untimely death? Did I let pass the abuse done to my niece? Did I impale him with the regal crown? Did I put Henry from his native right? And am I guerdoned at last with my shame? Shame on myself! For my desert is honour, and to repair my honour lost for him I here renounce him and return to Henry. - my noble queen, let former grudges pass and henceforth I am your true servitor. I will revenge his wrong to lady Bona, and replant Henry in his former state.

MARGARET:

Warwick, these words have turned my hate to love, and I forgive and quite forget old faults, and joy in your becoming King Henry's friend.

(doesn't take much to sway 'em, does it? ed.)

WARWICK:

So much his friend, aye, his unfeigned friend, that if king Louis will furnish us with a few of his best soldiers I'll undertake to land them on our coast and force the tyrant from his seat by war. His new-made bride will not help him. And as for Clarence, as my letters tell me he's very likely now to distance himself from him for his being more interested in wanton lust than honour or the streength and safety of our country.

BONA:

Dear brother, how better shall I be revenged other than by your helping this distressed queen?

MARGARET:

Renowned prince, how will Henry live without your rescuing him from foul despair?

BONA:

My quarrel and this English queen's are the same.

WARWICK:

And mine, fair lady Bona, joins with yours.

LOUIS:

And mine with hers, and yours and Margaret's. Therefore, at last I am resolved you shall have aid.

MARGARET:

let me give humble thanks for all at once.

LOUIS:

Then, England's messenger, return fast and tell false Edward, your supposed king, that Louis of France is sending over maskers to revel with him and his new bride. You've seen how things went. Go frighten your king withal.

BONA:

Tell him, in hope he'll be a widower shortly. I'll wear the willow-garland for his sake.

MARGARET:

Tell him my mourning-weeds are laid aside and I am ready to put armour on.

WARWICK:

Tell him from me that he has done me wrong, and therefore I'll uncrown him before long. Here's your reward. Begone.

(exit POST).

LOUIS:

But Warwick, you and Oxford, with five thousand men, shall cross the seas and bid false Edward battle, and as the occasion demands this noble queen and prince shall follow with a fresh supply. Yet, ere you go, answer me - what pledge have we of your firm loyalty?

WARWICK:

This: If our queen and this young prince agree I'll join my eldest daughter and my pride and joy to him forthwith in holy wedlock.

MARGARET:

Yes, I agree, and thank you for your motion. Son Edward, she is virtuous and fair, and therefore don't delay in giving your hand to Warwick, and with you hand, your irrevocable faith that only Warwick's daughter shall be yours.

PRINCE OF WALES:

Yes, I accept her, for she well deserves it. And here, to pledge my vow, I give my hand.

(he gives his hand to Warwick)

LOUIS:

Why are we waiting? These soldiers shall be levied, and you, Bourbon, our high admiral, shall waft them over with our fleet - I long for the day Edward falls by war's mischance for mocking the marriage with a dame of France.

(exit all except Warwick))

WARWICK:

I came from Edward as ambassador but I return his sworn and mortal foe. Matter of marriage was the charge he gave me, but dreadful war shall answer his demand. Had he nobody but me to make into a decoy? Then only I shall turn his jest into sorrow. I was the chief one to raise him to the crown, and I'll be the chief one to bring him down again.

Not that I pity Henry's misery, but that I seek revenge on Edward's mockery.

(exit).

More next week.

POLITICS.

A DISCUSSION about Shakespeare with visitors brought to light the theory (I am not a scholar in this area, so have not come across it before) that Shakespeare was engaged by some monarch to present past monarchs in certain lights that made said monarch more acceptable. Richard was thus presented as being even more of a murderer than other English monarchs, when in fact (so the lady argued) he killed nobody at all, and people have been trying to clear his name ever since.

This early spin-doctoring may or may not have happened, but the thing that interested me about this was that for whatever reason and whether or not murder was committed to achieve their ends, there seems to be no indication that a British monarch is anything other than either a yob or the descendant of yobs. At risk of repeating myself too closely, I would like to suggest that the nature of human beings is such that this is inevitably how monarchies come about. Forget all the stuff about sophistication and refinement, divine right of kings and inheritance, because sophistication and refinement and all that stuff would be swept aside by any yob who wants the monarchy and is willing to be aggressive enough to go for it (besides, have you noticed any sophistication and refinement?)

Necessarily, therefore, our current monarch and family are the direct descendants of a collection of self-interested yobs who went about Europe and Britain attacking anybody and everybody who did not agree with them, and declaring themselves to be king or queen.

Nothing more than that. Sad, isn't it?

...........................................................................................................................

The stuff that doesn`t often get changed now follows:

Alternet News.

Alternet News might appeal to some readers as a regular list of goings-on in the human rights/green areas of life. You can receive it by email. I have put one copy on this site so that you get an idea of what it is about and how to subscribe.

For sample Alternet email click here.

Biotechnology

Click here for an email that arrived in January 2000 concerning a proposed reasoned approach to this tricky subject

Goforth's social justice e-zine.

This interesting email magazine comes at fairly regular intervals and is of interest to almost anybody who is interested in human rights and green issues. In November 2000 it was going out to about 10,000 addresses. Try it. It won't cost you anything, and you can reproduce the contents without paying. You can subscribe by writing to them at: sjzine@netscape.net, or visit: Goforth's site

This website is about accounting investigations and fiddles. If you like to look at financial scandals (both hidden and public) this might be worth a look. I have not been there myself, but the books produced by these people, although difficult to follow, cover a lot of mysterious ground.

This website is about the destruction of countryside and agriculture. Worth a visit if you want to find out about how it is thought the British countryside will fair under the ongoing creep of the multinationals.

This website is one to do with monetary reform.The British Association for Monetary Reform. If you are interested in economics it is worth a look. http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~bamr1

This is a website about alternative currencies.Might be worth a look to those who have realised that you don't necessarily have to have money as such to be prosperous.

This is a website for something called The Green Guide. I know nothing about it, but am hoping it is something worthy. Please let me know if it is questionable.

This is a site concerned with one of the most unpopular planning decisions ever made in Greater London, the Crystal Palace Complex. It is so stunningly awful that only a handful of people who do not live near it appear to approve, whilst the rest are not entirely uninclined to mention such things as payola, freemasons....you name it! The site belongs to the London Borough of Bromley, but the aggro generated by it and the destruction of amenity caused by it will be almost entirely suffered by residents of adjoining boroughs and not the people of Bromley themselves.

This is a recycling site based in London, and offering materials to anybody. The organisation is a charity seeking to link suppliers of surplus materials with users. Especially good for the more ingenious designers amongst us.

The email of the people who run the above site is cs@london-recycling.demon.co.uk. They are called Creative Supplies. Look them up for more info.

Here's an interesting education site - particularly for those who have young children and are not quite sure what to do to avoid the worst of what`s on offer in the mainstream of education.They are called www.edrev.org.

early Othernews - 1992, 93, 94.

Early Other News essays.

There were a few essays that went out with the early Other News as a freestanding item. You can read these by clicking below.

Essays.

The Soup Designer`s Handbook.

The Soup Designer`s Handbook.

London Journey - a trip from Docklands through Beckenham and back to Docklands.

Friday Woodworkers.

(Friday Woodworkers are suffering a temporary break due to some of the episodes not having been fully edited at the time of writing. It may take some timne to fix this problem.

Episode 17.

(These articles were written in 1988, and were my first attempt at writing. Some people when shown these fell about laughing, some smiled faintly - and some yawned. I thought I was going to write a technical book, but it soon became apparent that I was much more interested in the people than the technology - and that is the main reason there are no drawings - although it might be rather good to do a couple of caricatures sometime.)

Index of Friday Woodorker articles (and a means of access).

Index of earlier issues.

Gabriele Gad on alternative therapy.

A READER COMPLAINED that it was not possible to go back more than 6 articles in Gabriele`s area. Regrettably this is because there is no index, and I have not the time to organise one yet. However, for those determined enough to find the early ones, they should be accessible by going to an early Other News and clicking through from it. This will not be fast, but I think will do the job. They started about November 1997 I think.

editor@othernews.co.uk

Cartoons and graphics.

drawings click here.

sheet music click here.

Consumers.

LEXMARK 3200 PRINTER.

In an earlier issue I told you about my feelings regarding Tempo retailers and the Lexmark 3200 printer I bought from them.

The Lexmark 3200 printer I got from Tempo must surely be the most uneconomical printer I could possibly have bought. The black cartridge only does about 250 pages of ordinary type - for 28! That makes each sheet cost 11.2 pence plus the cost of the paper and probably another 11.2 pence more if any colour is used! - ABOUT 22.4 PENCE A SHEET! Nearly a pound for every four sheets!

I wouldn`t recommend you to buy it - but also look at my earlier article for an idea of Tempo`s service.

Wanted

A person to help make up a subject index for the growing numbers of articles on The Other News From England. Email editor@othernews.co.uk (this may now have been provided, but please email if you might like to join in in some way - ed.)

All material on this site is copyright. Contact me if you want to use it. I am quite flexible. Educational non-profit use is free - but ask for permission and print an acknowledgement. If you can`t think what to print, put:

From The Other News From England. http://www.othernews.co.uk

Even better if you print the date of the article.

editor@othernews.co.uk

That`s all this week folks